Bioinks

Announcing Our Newest Bioink Kit - The Allevi Vascularization Kit

allevi 3d bioprinter bioprint bioprinted vascular network vascularization

One of the challenges within tissue engineering is creating thick tissues. Why is that? To date it has been challenging to add vascularization to 3D printed tissues. 

Vascularization is our body's highway system. Networks of veins reach each cell to deliver fresh oxygen and nutrients, and remove waste and carbon dioxide. This vascular network is essential for organ function.

The challenge within tissue engineering has been to replicate these networks, but even more so… to design them. We have been limited in our bioprinted tissue's thickness because it has been difficult to create these highways in the lab. ....Until now.

allevi vascularization bioink kit bioprint bioprinter bioprinted veins

We are excited to launch the Allevi Vascularization Kit that empowers you to replicate some of the most complex vascular trees in an easy way. It enables you to create cm thick tissues in an automated, standardized fashion and allows your thick tissues to live for weeks.

Vascularization is foundational to begin studying, and replicating the body outside the body in a more accurate way. We are excited to provide you with a cornerstone application within the Allevi platform to help you find solutions to humanity's most difficult problems.

Our New Sterile GelMA is Awesome!

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Gelatin Methacrylate (GelMA) is a popular material in bioprinting due to its mechanical properties and printability. However, the process of methacrylating gelatin and sterile filtering it is time-consuming, cumbersome, and inefficient.

We know how annoying it can be! So after months of testing - we're excited to release our new pre-sterilized and pre-loaded GelMA that is ready to be mixed with your cell suspensions and photo-initiators.

No more filtering. No more lost product. No more measuring. Just add your cells and start printing!

We want you to be the first to give it a try!

Allevi Author: Plant Based Hydrogels for Cell Laden Bioprinting

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Time for another inductee to the #AlleviAuthor club. Researchers from University of California, Berkeley and IBM used their Allevi 2 bioprinter to study the printability and viability of plant based bioinks.

In their paper titled, “Agarose-Based Hydrogels as Suitable Bioprinting Materials for Tissue Engineering” and published in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, they compared agarose-based hydrogels commonly used for cartilage tissue engineering to Pluronic. The goal is to find a bioink that has great printability without sacrificing cell viability.

The team compared mechanical and rheological properties, including yield stress, storage modulus, and shear thinning, as well as construct shape fidelity to assess their potential as a bioink for cell-based tissue engineering. Read on to find out which ratios of alginate and agarose demonstrated the best cell viability as well as print structure for their cartilage tissue engineering needs: https://cdn-pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsbiomaterials.8b00903.

Allevi Author: Lattices vs Sheets for Cardiac Tissue Bioprinting

There are so many variables that go into creating viable 3d bioprinted tissues; bioink selection, print geometry, cure times, rigidity, flexibility, degradation time and cell viability to name a few. Not to mention, each of these parameters needs to be analyzed and perfected for every cell line in the body. As a community, we are still figuring out the perfect protocol for each organ system.

In a new paper out this week titled “A Comparative Study of a 3D Bioprinted Gelatin-Based Lattice and Rectangular-Sheet Structures”, our newest Allevi Authors tackled one of these lingering questions, “What is the best print structure for cardiac tissue, lattice or sheet?”

Researchers at University of Texas El Paso and University of Texas at Austin used their Allevi 2 bioprinter and furfuryl gelatin to study and compare 3d bioprinted lattices vs sheets. Through their comparison, they discovered that the lattice structure was more porous with enhanced rheological properties and exhibited a lower degradation rate compared to the rectangular-sheet.

Further, the lattice allowed cells to proliferate to a greater extent compared to the rectangular-sheet. All of these results collectively affirmed that the lattice poses as a superior scaffold design for tissue engineering applications.

Read the full paper here to learn more about the rigorous testing and analysis the team conducted during their study.

Allevi Author: Review of Bone Biofabrication Methods & Bioinks

In the USA alone, 500,000 bone grafting procedures are performed annually, with musculoskeletal-related disabilities costing about $240 billion each year. In spite of the advancements over the past 20 years, scientists and engineers have been unable to provide a material that fulfills every characteristic needed for bone tissue to be physiologically relevant in clinical applications.

In this edition of the #AlleviAuthor series, our very own Director of Bioengineering, Taci Pereira, reviews state of the art bone tissue biofabrication technologies for the Journal of 3D Printing in Medicine.

hyperelastic bone compression tissue engineering bioprint bioprinter allevi

Pereira examines the six essential characteristics of bone graft materials; osteoinduction, osteoconduction, osteointegration, biocompatibility, translatability, and growth factor necessity.  

In addition to reviewing bioinks for bone engineering, Pereira examines the different techniques that have emerged within the biofabrication field; 3D bioprinting, selective laser sintering (SLS), electrospinning and stereolithography.

Read on below to learn about the promising methods for bone engineering, where Pereira sees a need for innovation and why she is excited for the future of Hyperelastic Bone.

State of the art biofabrication technologies and materials for bone tissue engineering