Bioinks

Introducing: The Allevi Tissue Layering Bioink Kit

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Your cells are smart. They know the forces around them, what materials they are in, and can even sense the smallest details in a bioink. Have you ever wondered how pure your bioinks are? Do they contain any thickening agents that can negatively affect tissue viability and function? It’s worth a look at the data sheet the next time you consider using a new bioink in lab.

Here at Allevi, we take great strides to source the purest bioinks that are most commonly found in our bodies. The collagens we choose provide unparalleled results that biologists and bioengineers love. There is a challenge in doing this though; pure collagen has historically been a very difficult bioink to work with because it is difficult to pattern. Low concentrations of collagen (like the concentration found in your body) have a very low viscosity, making it hard to control the geometry of the tissue and hindering cell directed proliferation.

We have been working in our lab for over a year trying to crack the code on low concentration collagen bioprinting. So much amazing research has already been conducted with collagen that we wanted to make it easy for you to bring that research to the next level with 3D bioprinting.

We’re proud to announce that we have finally achieved the ability to pattern pure collagen in an automated fashion. With our proprietary CORE™ printhead and our new Tissue Layering Kit, you are now able to print and pattern 3 mg/mL type I collagen or 8 mg/mL type I methacrylated collagen. This is the first time that such low concentrations of pure collagen can be printed, patterned, and layered through 3D bioprinting. We can’t wait to see what you will do with this one!

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The Allevi Coaxial Kit

We’re happy to announce the newest addition to our growing library of bioink kits - the Allevi Coxial Kit.

This new bioink kit allows users with an Allevi 2, Allevi 3 or Allevi 6 to mix materials from two syringes during the printing process. This is especially useful when working with materials that require curing catalysts or liquid crosslinking agents (i.e. sodium alginate, calcium chloride, certain silicones, etc).

The ability to mix materials at the nozzle opens up a whole new frontier of materials that you are able to extrude from your Allevi bioprinter. The Coaxial Kit is prepackaged with everything you need to get started out of the box including coaxial tip, tubing, luer lock tip connectors, and custom coaxial gcode.

Our mission here at Allevi is to supply you with best possible bioprinting tools that make it easy to bring your work to life. We are constantly testing new methods, bioinks, and tools in our lab to ensure that we are delivering cutting edge techniques to your bench. Together we are making giant strides in the field of tissue engineering and uncovering new methods that will forever change the way we #buildwithlife. We can’t wait to see what you will build with this one.

Announcing Our Newest Bioink Kit - The Allevi Vascularization Kit

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One of the challenges within tissue engineering is creating thick tissues. Why is that? To date it has been challenging to add vascularization to 3D printed tissues. 

Vascularization is our body's highway system. Networks of veins reach each cell to deliver fresh oxygen and nutrients, and remove waste and carbon dioxide. This vascular network is essential for organ function.

The challenge within tissue engineering has been to replicate these networks, but even more so… to design them. We have been limited in our bioprinted tissue's thickness because it has been difficult to create these highways in the lab. ....Until now.

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We are excited to launch the Allevi Vascularization Kit that empowers you to replicate some of the most complex vascular trees in an easy way. It enables you to create cm thick tissues in an automated, standardized fashion and allows your thick tissues to live for weeks.

Vascularization is foundational to begin studying, and replicating the body outside the body in a more accurate way. We are excited to provide you with a cornerstone application within the Allevi platform to help you find solutions to humanity's most difficult problems.

Our New Sterile GelMA is Awesome!

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Gelatin Methacrylate (GelMA) is a popular material in bioprinting due to its mechanical properties and printability. However, the process of methacrylating gelatin and sterile filtering it is time-consuming, cumbersome, and inefficient.

We know how annoying it can be! So after months of testing - we're excited to release our new pre-sterilized and pre-loaded GelMA that is ready to be mixed with your cell suspensions and photo-initiators.

No more filtering. No more lost product. No more measuring. Just add your cells and start printing!

We want you to be the first to give it a try!

Allevi Author: Plant Based Hydrogels for Cell Laden Bioprinting

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Time for another inductee to the #AlleviAuthor club. Researchers from University of California, Berkeley and IBM used their Allevi 2 bioprinter to study the printability and viability of plant based bioinks.

In their paper titled, “Agarose-Based Hydrogels as Suitable Bioprinting Materials for Tissue Engineering” and published in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, they compared agarose-based hydrogels commonly used for cartilage tissue engineering to Pluronic. The goal is to find a bioink that has great printability without sacrificing cell viability.

The team compared mechanical and rheological properties, including yield stress, storage modulus, and shear thinning, as well as construct shape fidelity to assess their potential as a bioink for cell-based tissue engineering. Read on to find out which ratios of alginate and agarose demonstrated the best cell viability as well as print structure for their cartilage tissue engineering needs: https://cdn-pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsbiomaterials.8b00903.