allevi 2

Allevi Now Available Through VWR

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Here at Allevi, we are constantly working to make our bioprinters and bioinks accessible to scientists worldwide.  Our mission is to get Allevi 3D bioprinters into the best research labs where they can accelerate the pace of discovery and push the boundaries of biology. That's why today we're excited to announce that you can now shop Allevi products on the world's leading life science equipment distributor; VWR International. 

Now it’s easier than ever to get an Allevi bioprinter into your lab and begin changing the world. Join us.

Allevi Author: UPenn bioprints custom nasal defects

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We're proud to bring you yet another #AlleviAuthor - this one from down the street at University of Pennsylvania.  Dr. Chamith Rajapakse's Lab at UPenn focuses on the development and application of image guided 3D bioprinting for personalized clinical applications.

In his most recent publication, Dr. Rajapakse bioprinted a scaffold that precisely matched a patient’s nasal septal defect, in both size and shape using the Allevi 2 bioprinter. This serves as the first step in a major goal to create patient-specific tissue engineered grafts for NSP repair and beyond.

Here at Allevi, we envision a future of truly personalized medicine. The research by Dr. Rajapakse and his lab brings this future that much closer within the bone, cartilage and muscle tissue types.  One can being to imagine the future of being able to reconstruct cleft palates, nasal septal perforations, broken bones, torn ligaments, vertebrae and so much more.

Read on for the abstract and check out the full publication here.

Abstract: Nasal septal perforations (NSPs) are relatively common. They can be problematic for both patients and head and neck reconstructive surgeons who attempt to repair them. Often, this repair is made using an interpositional graft sandwiched between bilateral mucoperichondrial advancement flaps. The ideal graft is nasal septal cartilage. However, many patients with NSP lack sufficient septal cartilage to harvest. Harvesting other sources of autologous cartilage grafts, such as auricular cartilage, adds morbidity to the surgical case and results in a graft that lacks the ideal qualities required to repair the nasal septum. Tissue engineering has allowed for new reconstructive protocols to be developed. Currently, the authors are unaware of any new literature that looks to improve repair of NSP using custom tissue-engineered cartilage grafts. The first step of this process involves developing a protocol to print the graft from a patient's pre-operative CT.

In this study, CT scans were converted into STereoLithography (STL) file format. The subsequent STL files were transformed into 3D printable G-Code using the Slic3r software. This allowed us to customize the parameters of our print and we were able to choose a layer thickness of 0.1mm.  A desktop 3D bioprinter (Allevi 2) was then used to construct the scaffold.

This method resulted in the production of a PCL scaffold that precisely matched the patient’s nasal septal defect, in both size and shape. This serves as the first step in our goal to create patient-specific tissue engineered nasal septal cartilage grafts for NSP repair.

BBC's The One Show Visits Allevi Power User, Dr Sam Pashneh-Tala

BBC's The One Show recently stopped by Dr. Sam Pashneh-Tala's lab at the University of Sheffield to learn more about tissue engineering and 3D bioprinting.

Dr. Pashneh-Tala’s research is focused on developing novel tissue-engineered blood vessels for use in vascular surgery. Current strategies rely on autograft vessels; which are of limited availability, variable quality and are prone to infection and blood clotting. Using tissue engineering and 3d biofabrication techniques, Dr. Pashneh-Tala is developing methods to allow blood vessels of custom geometries to be produced.

Check out the video below to learn more about the amazing research that is being performed today in his lab and the future of 3d bioprinting:

Dr. Pashneh Tala's research is bringing the future of 3d bioprinted tissues and organs that much closer. We can't wait to see what he will do next.  

Allevi Author: 3D bioprinting drug delivery systems

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Time for another #AlleviAuthor - Researchers from Abo Akademi, University of Helsinki and University of Turku use the Allevi 2 to 3D bioprint drug delivery systems.

Their paper studies the printability of PDMS to manufacture drug containing structures of different pore sizes and different drug loadings. The 3d bioprinted structures contained prednisolone as the model drug.

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The work showed that by altering the surface area/volume ratio it was possible to print structures with differences in the release rate. The fact that the 3d bioprinting was performed at room temperature makes this an interesting alternative for manufacturing controlled release device with temperature susceptible drugs.

Imagine being able to 3d print the perfect drug for YOUR biology - to be able to control geometry, custom release rates, and multi-drug composition. This paper explores the future of truly personalized drug delivery.

Download the full paper here.

The Disruption Continues at TERMIS, with Allevi 2

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Last week was a big week for bioprinting and tissue engineering. You may have heard that we officially came out of Beta and launched the most advanced 3D bioprinter ever created, we call it Allevi 2. You can check out the amazing design and read more about the specs on our website.

We really could not have built this system without the support of our early Beta clients, you guys have been amazing at getting us the right feedback and making sure that we continue to blow the competition out of the water.  We’re happy to be able to embrace new members into our community of pioneers uncovering the greatest mystery of our generation – life.

Our goal at Allevi has always been to create standards and modular systems that can engineer biology to cure disease, eliminate the organ waiting list, revert climate change and push humans to live on other planets. We can’t wait to see what all of our old friends and new users will build, now that they have access to the most powerful biofabrication tool and fastest growing bioprinting community ever created.