allevi applications

Allevi Author: Brigham & Women's Hospital Proves Porous is Preferred

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We’re so excited to welcome the Yu Shrike Zhang lab from Brigham & Women’s Hospital to the Allevi Author Club!

3D bioprinting is an amazing technology which allows researchers to create custom cell-laden constructs that mimic the human body better than their 2D counterparts. Here at Allevi, our mission is to make it easy for scientists to replicate the body outside the body. Our community of users is composed of the leadings minds in tissue engineering and they are working on every type of tissue from brain to bone.

Agnostic of tissue type, one of most important aspects of 3d bioprinting is ensuring that your cells organize and proliferate as they would in your body. Bioinks provide cells with a much needed support that allows them to more easily organize into the geometries that they would in native tissue. However, if a bioink is too dense or too rigid, it can actually hinder the proliferation of cells and prevent them from performing their needed function.

Our new #AlleviAuthors tackled this problem in their new paper titled “Aqueous Two‐Phase Emulsion Bioink‐Enabled 3D Bioprinting of Porous Hydrogels” and published in Advanced Materials.

By creating an aqueous bioink emulsion, the researchers were able to create a construct that is porous in composition while at the same time providing the rigidity needed in order to create 3D constructs. Their bioink is composed of cells mixed with GelMA and PEO which are immiscible materials - meaning that they do not mix in a homogenous manner. A classic example of immiscible liquids is oil and water. The fact that GelMA and PEO naturally repel each other means that small droplets of each material exist side by side within the bioink.

Using the Allevi 2 bioprinters, this bioink was bioprinted and crosslinked to form the desired geometry and rigidity of the tissue type that you are recreating. After the desired geometry has been achieved, you are then able to remove the PEO from the construct leaving small holes in the structure that allow cells to proliferate with greater ease.

The researchers tested their new method across 3 different cell lines and found that the porous 3D-bioprinted hydrogels showed enhanced cell viability and proliferation vs nonporous hydrogels. This new method means that researchers across any tissue type are now able to create porous-structures with higher cell viability. We’re excited to see the FAR reaching effects of this method for our entire community of Allevi researchers!

Read on to learn more about their novel bioink and how to incorporate it into your research: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/adma.201805460

Allevi Author: 3D‐Printed Sugar Stents to Aid in Surgery

Microvascular anastomosis (or the method of surgically connecting blood vessels) is a common part of many reconstructive and transplant surgical procedures.

There are multiple methods for connecting two veins together including coupling devices, surgical glue, and surgical suturing but each method has it’s downsides; coupling devices can face rejection from the body, glue can introduce contamination or clotting to the vein, and suturing (the most commonly accepted practice) is a delicate and time consuming procedure.

 
suturing blood vessels
 

During the suturing procedure, surgeons are in a race against the clock to quickly connect the veins together to ensure that organs continue to receive proper blood flow. However, blood vessels of differing shapes and sizes can sometimes make this procedure difficult to maneuver in a timely fashion.

 
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In their recent paper titled, “3D‐Printed Sugar‐Based Stents Facilitating Vascular Anastomosis”, researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital & The University of Nebraska Lincoln collaborated using an Allevi 2 bioprinter to find a solution to aid in the intricacies surrounding this procedure.

Here, dissolvable sugar‐based stents are 3D printed as an assistive tool for facilitating surgical anastomosis. The non-brittle sugar‐based stent holds the vessels together during the procedure and are dissolved upon the restoration of the blood flow. The incorporation of sodium citrate minimizes the chance of thrombosis, and the dissolution rate of the sugar‐based stent can be tailored between 4 and 8 min.

 
allevi 2 3d bioprinter fabricates sugar stents to aid in surgical procedure
 

3D printing is an ideal method for constructing these stents because you are able to quickly design and create custom geometries to fit the patient’s vessels.

The effectiveness of the printed sugar‐based stent was assessed ex vivo and found to be a fast and reliable fabrication method that can be performed in the operating room.

This new method of aiding surgeons is a game-changer as it is dissolvable, tunable, and completely customizable. In the future, your doctor could quickly print out stents to match your exact vein geometry which would reduce the time spent on the operating table and under anesthesia.

Interested in learning more about this novel technique? You can read the full paper here: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/adhm.201800702?af=R&

Allevi Author: Tohoku University Images Cell Activity in Hyrdrogels

tohoku university allevi bioprinter bioprinted hydrogel imaging

One of the most rewarding “AHA” moments of bioprinting is seeing your cells proliferate within a 3D tissue. As 3D bioprinting becomes more widely adopted within the fields of tissue engineering and personalized medicine, it is important that researchers have the ability to monitor cell activity within in a 3D structure AFTER the print is finished.

Our most recent Allevi Authors have tackled the method of electrochemically monitoring a tissue in their new paper out in the Analytical Sciences Journal titled, “Electrochemical Imaging of Cell Activity in Hydrogels Embedded in Grid-Shaped Polycaprolactone Scaffolds Using a Large-scale Integration (LSI)-based Amperometric Device”.

In their paper, researchers from Tohoku University in Japan use their Allevi 2 bioprinter to print PCL scaffolds as a support material for photocured hydrogels. They then used an amperometric device to electrochemically monitor the living cells. Through their study, they were able to determine that electrochemical imaging is a great way to monitor cell differentiation and will be useful for evaluating the viability of thicker bioprinted tissues.

Congratulations to the Tohoku University researchers on their findings!

Allevi Now Available Through VWR

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Here at Allevi, we are constantly working to make our bioprinters and bioinks accessible to scientists worldwide.  Our mission is to get Allevi 3D bioprinters into the best research labs where they can accelerate the pace of discovery and push the boundaries of biology. That's why today we're excited to announce that you can now shop Allevi products on the world's leading life science equipment distributor; VWR International. 

Now it’s easier than ever to get an Allevi bioprinter into your lab and begin changing the world. Join us.

Bioprinting offers hope of new treatment paths for cancer patients

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Our amazing users at The University of Waikato will use their Allevi 2 to research new treatment paths for cancer patients that could eventually lead to cancer tumors being treated outside patients' bodies.

We are constantly inspired by this amazing community of scientists who are changing the way we design, heal and build with life. And we're here to support them along the way! Read on to learn more about this incredible research.