bioinks

Bioprinting in the News: 'Bioprinters Are Churning Out Living Fixes to Broken Spines' By WIRED

Image courtesy of www.wired.com

Image courtesy of www.wired.com

Bioprinters are an essential piece of lab equipment for any scientist, researcher, or doctor that wants to study cells in a relevant way. This is because cells in 3D behave differently than their counterparts studied in a 2D environment; they express more accurate biomarkers and perform more physiologically relevant actions. Bioprinters accelerate the pace of research and allow scientists to find innovative solutions to real world problems.

This awesome article by WIRED profiles a team at UC San Diego that has bioprinted a section of spinal cord that can be custom-fit into a patient’s injury.

It’s awesome to see how bioprinting allows researchers to reliably study the body outside the body. Together, we can change the way we study and treat illness!

Read the full article here.

Announcing Our Newest Bioink Kit - The Allevi Vascularization Kit

allevi 3d bioprinter bioprint bioprinted vascular network vascularization

One of the challenges within tissue engineering is creating thick tissues. Why is that? To date it has been challenging to add vascularization to 3D printed tissues. 

Vascularization is our body's highway system. Networks of veins reach each cell to deliver fresh oxygen and nutrients, and remove waste and carbon dioxide. This vascular network is essential for organ function.

The challenge within tissue engineering has been to replicate these networks, but even more so… to design them. We have been limited in our bioprinted tissue's thickness because it has been difficult to create these highways in the lab. ....Until now.

allevi vascularization bioink kit bioprint bioprinter bioprinted veins

We are excited to launch the Allevi Vascularization Kit that empowers you to replicate some of the most complex vascular trees in an easy way. It enables you to create cm thick tissues in an automated, standardized fashion and allows your thick tissues to live for weeks.

Vascularization is foundational to begin studying, and replicating the body outside the body in a more accurate way. We are excited to provide you with a cornerstone application within the Allevi platform to help you find solutions to humanity's most difficult problems.

Our New Sterile GelMA is Awesome!

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Gelatin Methacrylate (GelMA) is a popular material in bioprinting due to its mechanical properties and printability. However, the process of methacrylating gelatin and sterile filtering it is time-consuming, cumbersome, and inefficient.

We know how annoying it can be! So after months of testing - we're excited to release our new pre-sterilized and pre-loaded GelMA that is ready to be mixed with your cell suspensions and photo-initiators.

No more filtering. No more lost product. No more measuring. Just add your cells and start printing!

We want you to be the first to give it a try!

Allevi Now Available Through VWR

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Here at Allevi, we are constantly working to make our bioprinters and bioinks accessible to scientists worldwide.  Our mission is to get Allevi 3D bioprinters into the best research labs where they can accelerate the pace of discovery and push the boundaries of biology. That's why today we're excited to announce that you can now shop Allevi products on the world's leading life science equipment distributor; VWR International. 

Now it’s easier than ever to get an Allevi bioprinter into your lab and begin changing the world. Join us.

Allevi Author: Plant Based Hydrogels for Cell Laden Bioprinting

plant based hydrogels allevi bioprint.jpg

Time for another inductee to the #AlleviAuthor club. Researchers from University of California, Berkeley and IBM used their Allevi 2 bioprinter to study the printability and viability of plant based bioinks.

In their paper titled, “Agarose-Based Hydrogels as Suitable Bioprinting Materials for Tissue Engineering” and published in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, they compared agarose-based hydrogels commonly used for cartilage tissue engineering to Pluronic. The goal is to find a bioink that has great printability without sacrificing cell viability.

The team compared mechanical and rheological properties, including yield stress, storage modulus, and shear thinning, as well as construct shape fidelity to assess their potential as a bioink for cell-based tissue engineering. Read on to find out which ratios of alginate and agarose demonstrated the best cell viability as well as print structure for their cartilage tissue engineering needs: https://cdn-pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsbiomaterials.8b00903.