collagen

Introducing: The Allevi Tissue Layering Bioink Kit

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Your cells are smart. They know the forces around them, what materials they are in, and can even sense the smallest details in a bioink. Have you ever wondered how pure your bioinks are? Do they contain any thickening agents that can negatively affect tissue viability and function? It’s worth a look at the data sheet the next time you consider using a new bioink in lab.

Here at Allevi, we take great strides to source the purest bioinks that are most commonly found in our bodies. The collagens we choose provide unparalleled results that biologists and bioengineers love. There is a challenge in doing this though; pure collagen has historically been a very difficult bioink to work with because it is difficult to pattern. Low concentrations of collagen (like the concentration found in your body) have a very low viscosity, making it hard to control the geometry of the tissue and hindering cell directed proliferation.

We have been working in our lab for over a year trying to crack the code on low concentration collagen bioprinting. So much amazing research has already been conducted with collagen that we wanted to make it easy for you to bring that research to the next level with 3D bioprinting.

We’re proud to announce that we have finally achieved the ability to pattern pure collagen in an automated fashion. With our proprietary CORE™ printhead and our new Tissue Layering Kit, you are now able to print and pattern 3 mg/mL type I collagen or 8 mg/mL type I methacrylated collagen. This is the first time that such low concentrations of pure collagen can be printed, patterned, and layered through 3D bioprinting. We can’t wait to see what you will do with this one!

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Meet Allevi 3: The bioprinter for every application.

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Have you noticed? Exciting things are happening in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Since our humble beginnings, the Allevi community has grown to labs in all corners of the globe and includes the world’s best scientists and pharmaceutical innovators. And your work is having an impact.

With every new #AlleviAuthor paper that gets published, our incredible community wows us with yet another mind-blowing application. Whether you are creating personalized bone grafts, printing tumor models for better drug testing, or studying the dynamics of the vasculature system - we provided you a tool and you have amazed us with what you have accomplished with it.

Today, we’re excited to announce the newest addition to the Allevi family of 3D bioprinters that was inspired by your work - the Allevi 3. The Allevi 3 is easy to use, extremely versatile, and yet still incredibly powerful. Check out the bioprinter that can bring your work to life. What will you build?

The Challenges and Advances of Imitating Nature

Allevi Advanced Biomatrix additives bioink additives for 3d bioprinting tissue and organs on 3d bioprinter

One of the largest hurdles of in vitro cell culture has been to mimic conditions that closely resemble in vivo outcomes. Significant strides have been made to this end in the past decades with progress accelerating in more recent years.

One approach that has widely-contributed to progress in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine has been to imitate the human body as accurately as possible. Tissues and organs consist of a milieu of extracellular matrices with varying quantities and placements.

With the advances in 3D bioprinting, scientists now have another tool to move closer to engineering tissues and organs that are more in vivo-like. Employing 3D bioprinting, a variety of ECMs can be precisely deposited in more native formats. 3D bioprinters now have multiple dispensing heads that can simultaneously lay down the ECM with cells in tissue and organ-like configurations. Furthermore, discoveries have recently been made creating native bioinks that are compatible with 3D bioprinters. A combination of such advances and discoveries with 3D bioprinters and native ECM bioinks likely propel future advancements in tissue and organ fabrication.

Further, native collagen bioinks consisting of Type I collagen can also be blended with other ECM’s to formulate more in vivo-like bioinks. Some of these ECMs include Type I, II, III, IV, V collagens, hyaluronic acid, elastin (tropoelastin), fibronectin and vitronectin. ECMs play a major role in achieving the proper cell behavior, cell adhesion signals and binding sites.

In addition to formulating a more optimal ECM environment, cells can be pre-mixed with the bioinks and bioprinted. The cells, in many cases, have been shown to remodel the tissue. Cells secrete and deposit their own intrinsic ECMs, growth factors, cytokines and other biologically relevant components.

The combination of these advanced 3D bioprinters, and cell-laden yet native-to-the-body bioinks, greatly enhance the capabilities and tools available to tissue engineers and scientists.

Allevi is excited to begin offering a broad line of native extracellular matrix proteins from Advanced BioMatrix (ABM) to serve as additives to many of Allevi’s BioInks. Bowman Bagley, Director of Business Development at ABM, comments: “The bar is being raised each day as new publications come out. Researchers are beginning to reject non-native materials as new native, yet printable, bioinks have emerged and are commercially available. The quest to bioprint tissues and organs begins with bioinks composed of native proteins that best replicate a natural, in vivo-like cellular environment. Our goal is to provide all of the proteins that help best replicate the human body when bioprinting. To print native tissues, we need native bioinks.”

As we continue to try and control tissue design, Allevi continues to provide the tools that will allow scientist to most accurately represent human architecture.