drugs

Allevi Author: 3D bioprinting drug delivery systems

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Time for another #AlleviAuthor - Researchers from Abo Akademi, University of Helsinki and University of Turku use the Allevi 2 to 3D bioprint drug delivery systems.

Their paper studies the printability of PDMS to manufacture drug containing structures of different pore sizes and different drug loadings. The 3d bioprinted structures contained prednisolone as the model drug.

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The work showed that by altering the surface area/volume ratio it was possible to print structures with differences in the release rate. The fact that the 3d bioprinting was performed at room temperature makes this an interesting alternative for manufacturing controlled release device with temperature susceptible drugs.

Imagine being able to 3d print the perfect drug for YOUR biology - to be able to control geometry, custom release rates, and multi-drug composition. This paper explores the future of truly personalized drug delivery.

Download the full paper here.

Allevi Author: Allevi and Dr. Anthony Atala

Allevi Author publication

With a 12% success rate for drugs entering clinical trials, there is no doubt that drug companies need more accurate prediction platforms to help them save billions in bringing a drug to market. 3D cellular models, such as spheroids, organoids and organ-on-chips, offer a promising solution to this issue. But how can these models be built at the complexity and scale needed for pharma? Bioprinting’s ability for increased complexity and automation is the clear answer.

Read our co-authored paper with Dr. Anthony Atala, Director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) and featured on TED, describing the potential of bioprinting to improve drug testing. 

“Bioprinted organoids can potentially provide significant benefits to drug companies and patients alike,” said Atala. “More accurate and faster testing brings new drugs to market sooner, and the possibility of engineering tumors in the lab from a patient’s own cells mean patients can get the best therapy right away – without time spent taking therapies that won’t work for them.” 

10 Cools Things You Could Print with a 3D Bioprinter in the Near Future

3D bioprinting is an intuitive way to approach biology. But not many people realize its versatility. To give an idea of what is possible through 3D bioprinting, we’re starting a little series called “Allevi Applications.” Hopefully, this will make the idea of bioprinting a little more accessible! So without further ado, let’s get started.

1. Joint replacements, think knee, ankle and elbow.

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2. Microfluidic chips

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3. Cell scaffolds for replacement organs, eventually making fulling functioning organs

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4. Cartilage

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5. Accurate surgical models for physicians to practice difficult procedures

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6. Drugs with custom release rates, compositions and geometries

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7. Teeth and dental implants

8. Skin grafts for burn victims

9. Casts and bioactive clothing

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10.  Blood vessels, arteries and heart valves

And our users are just getting started. Check back as we cover new publications from #Allevi Authors and see what amazing applications they come up with next.