surgical models

3D Bioprinting Replacement Heart Valves

allevi advanced biomatrix collagen aortic pulmonary heart valve bioprint 3d bioprinted

Throwing it back today to show you this heart valve that was 3d bioprinted using the Allevi 2 with collagen from Advanced BioMatrix.

Your heart has four valves (one for each chamber) that are made up of thin flaps of tissue called cusps. These flaps open and close to allow blood to move through the heart while beating.  The cusps attach to an outer ring of tougher tissue called the annulus. The annulus helps the valve maintain proper shape under the normal strains and stresses of a heartbeat. 

 
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It is essential that your valves open and close tightly to ensure proper blood flow through the heart and onto the rest of your body. A diseased or damaged valve can give you an irregular heartbeat and eventually lead to heart failure. More than 5 million Americans are diagnosed with heart valve disease every year.

 
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Many people can live with valve disease and do not require surgery. However, in some cases, the valve needs to be fixed or replaced. Current methods for replacing a damaged valve included plastic parts or animal tissues.

Allevi users are working towards a future where your #doctor is able to 3d bioprint a custom replacement valve from your own heart cells to reduce the rate of failure and rejection. 3D bioprinting is an amazing design tool that allows you to print custom geometries and tune the rheological properties to provide your cells with the support structure they need to do their job. Just another amazing way our users are changing the future of medicine. #buildwithlife #healwithlife

Allevi Author: 3D‐Printed Sugar Stents to Aid in Surgery

Microvascular anastomosis (or the method of surgically connecting blood vessels) is a common part of many reconstructive and transplant surgical procedures.

There are multiple methods for connecting two veins together including coupling devices, surgical glue, and surgical suturing but each method has it’s downsides; coupling devices can face rejection from the body, glue can introduce contamination or clotting to the vein, and suturing (the most commonly accepted practice) is a delicate and time consuming procedure.

 
suturing blood vessels
 

During the suturing procedure, surgeons are in a race against the clock to quickly connect the veins together to ensure that organs continue to receive proper blood flow. However, blood vessels of differing shapes and sizes can sometimes make this procedure difficult to maneuver in a timely fashion.

 
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In their recent paper titled, “3D‐Printed Sugar‐Based Stents Facilitating Vascular Anastomosis”, researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital & The University of Nebraska Lincoln collaborated using an Allevi 2 bioprinter to find a solution to aid in the intricacies surrounding this procedure.

Here, dissolvable sugar‐based stents are 3D printed as an assistive tool for facilitating surgical anastomosis. The non-brittle sugar‐based stent holds the vessels together during the procedure and are dissolved upon the restoration of the blood flow. The incorporation of sodium citrate minimizes the chance of thrombosis, and the dissolution rate of the sugar‐based stent can be tailored between 4 and 8 min.

 
allevi 2 3d bioprinter fabricates sugar stents to aid in surgical procedure
 

3D printing is an ideal method for constructing these stents because you are able to quickly design and create custom geometries to fit the patient’s vessels.

The effectiveness of the printed sugar‐based stent was assessed ex vivo and found to be a fast and reliable fabrication method that can be performed in the operating room.

This new method of aiding surgeons is a game-changer as it is dissolvable, tunable, and completely customizable. In the future, your doctor could quickly print out stents to match your exact vein geometry which would reduce the time spent on the operating table and under anesthesia.

Interested in learning more about this novel technique? You can read the full paper here: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/adhm.201800702?af=R&

10 Cools Things You Could Print with a 3D Bioprinter in the Near Future

3D bioprinting is an intuitive way to approach biology. But not many people realize its versatility. To give an idea of what is possible through 3D bioprinting, we’re starting a little series called “Allevi Applications.” Hopefully, this will make the idea of bioprinting a little more accessible! So without further ado, let’s get started.

1. Joint replacements, think knee, ankle and elbow.

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2. Microfluidic chips

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3. Cell scaffolds for replacement organs, eventually making fulling functioning organs

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4. Cartilage

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5. Accurate surgical models for physicians to practice difficult procedures

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6. Drugs with custom release rates, compositions and geometries

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7. Teeth and dental implants

8. Skin grafts for burn victims

9. Casts and bioactive clothing

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10.  Blood vessels, arteries and heart valves

And our users are just getting started. Check back as we cover new publications from #Allevi Authors and see what amazing applications they come up with next.